Dahlia Flower Arranging Gardeners Tips

The pompom and decorative types of Dahlia are the best for flower arranging. The large headed flower types are difficult to arrange.
There is a tremendous variety of colour and shades to suit every decorative scheme. Grow varieties and shades that suit your house.
Eden Project Dahlia

Starting and Cultivating Dahlia

  • Plant late May or June. The larger plants will need staking.
  • When plants are 12-18″ high nip out the growing point to encourage side shoots which become flowering stems.
  • Mulch the plants and water generously. Fortnightly foliar feed is recommended.
  • Lift tubers in winter and store frost free. Large tubers can be divided before replanting.
  • For more on Dahlias read easy and easier dahlias even though the even-easier dahlias are grown from seed.
  • Thompson & Morgan supply plants and seeds.

Conditioning and Arranging Dahlias

  • Dahlias like a little sugar in the water.
  • An asprin or drop of bleach in the water will control algae growth. Change water every other day.
  • Put the ends of the stems in a little boiling water, then give them a long, deep drink.
  • The bright colours mean they can be used as a focal point in a mixed display
  • Dahlias are free flowering and provide a good supply so we prefer large bunches.
  • Pink Dahlias seem to blend well with purple, red and other pink flowers

Dahlia

Varieties of Dahlia

  • Some Dahlia are better cut flowers than others. Single flowers often do better than doubles.
  • Older varieties to consider include Angora cactus type, Lilac Time, Gold Crown and Chorus Girl
  • Red varieties Doris Day and Cherry Ripe or white Polar Bear are said to be good doers.
  • I have seen Trentonian, old gold and copper; Waverlet Pearl, apricot; Isabel McElney, salmon pink and Fancy Free, pale copper also recommended.

Turn your arrangements into botanical works of art – here are some examples and clubs you could join.

To grow a generic mix of flowers for arrangements and bouquets check out Thompson & Morgan


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