Flower Arranging – Pittosporum

Pittosporum Tenuifolium 'Tom Thumb'

Growing Pittosporum for Flower Arrangements

  • Pittosporum is a genus of evergreen shrubs and small trees that grow well in coastal areas and sheltered situations.
  • The popular cut foliage has pale green undulate leaves on black twiggy stems.
  • Pittosporum tennuifolium is the most popular species with florists and gardeners as it is hardy
  • Other colours of leaf are available including Pittosporum tennuifolium Purpureum (above), Pittosporum tennuifolium Variegatum with crinkled greeny white leaves and Pittosporum tennuifolium Warnham Gold.

Book Cover
Flower Arranging by Mark Welford and Stephen Wicks

Special Tips for Flower Arranging with Pittosporum

  • The dense nature of the leaves on the black twiggy stems makes Pittosporum a good filler for a hand tied arrangement.
  • Before using the stems split them and stand them in a bucket of cold water overnight.
  • Bunches can be wrapped in cellophane as a gift or used in a bridal bouquet
  • To make a hand-tied bunch hold the stem of the first piece of plant in your hand and gradually add one piece at a time. Spiral the the stems in one direction only as you build up your design. When the bunch is complete tie off with raffia or twine at the point where your hand held the bunch. Finally trim the bottom of the stalks to the same length (it might even stand up on it’s own.)

Pittosporum in the rain

A full array of books on Flower Arranging and related subjects is available from Amazon. You will find more advice and artistic inspiration amongst this selection.

I would also recommend the Harrogate spring flower show where I am always stunned by the floral arrangement amongst the plants on display.
Pittosporum

Credits
Pittosporum Tenuifolium ‘Tom Thumb’ by ᚛Tilly Mint ᚜, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
Pittosporum in the rain by wallygrom CC BY-SA 2.0
Pittosporum tenuifolium by chuck b. CC BY 2.0

Pittosporum tenuifolium

Pittosporum tenuifolium can be used for flower arranging to good effect due to the dense nature of the crinkly edged leaves on dark stems. grow in sheltered locations to get plenty of useful foliage.

To grow a generic mix of flowers for arrangements and bouquets check out Thompson & Morgan

Other plants discussed in this series
Dahlia
Euphorbia
Alstroemeria
Fatsia Japonica
Corkscrew hazel
Phormium


Trackbacks/Pingbacks

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