Flower Arranging – Hostas

Book Cover

The Cutting Garden: Growing and Arranging Garden Flowers by Sarah Raven

Growing Hostas for Flower Arrangements

  • Hostas are a group of over 200 species of perennials from China, Japan and Korea that grow well in the UK & North America.
  • In the garden they appreciate shade and protection from slugs.
  • As flower arranging plants they are in demand for the shape, size, colour and texture of the leaves.
  • Size varies from small leaves of Hosta venusta 4 inches high to large leaves of Hosta sieboldiana 2 feet across and more.
  • Hosta fortunei leaves turn rich yellow in Autumn and Hosta unulata is bi-coloured green and yellow with twisting leaves.
  • Hosta flowers from June onward but they are not particularly striking

otley show hostas 051

Special Tips for Flower Arranging with Hostas

  • Prior to arranging Hosta leaves condition them overnight in a deep bucket of water. Even submerging them will do no harm.
  • Stems are quite soft so if putting them into Oasis make a small hole with a stick first.
  • Leaves do not mature before May and would just wilt if cut too early.
  • Yellowe leaved varieties appreciate a bit more sunshine.
  • Hostas are useful for all-green arrangements.

A full array of books on Flower Arranging and related subjects is available from Amazon. You will find more advice and artistic inspiration amongst this selection.
I would also recommend the Harrogate spring flower show where I am always stunned by the floral arrangement amongst the plants on display.

Flower Arrangement
Turn your arrangements into botanical works of art – here are some examples and clubs you could join.
Credits
Flower Arrangement by Dominic’s pics CC BY 2.0

Hostas have sculptural leaves in a range of colours from bright green to glaucus blue with yellow and bicoloured varieties that can all contribute to your flower arranging expertise. Grow a few plants and see what we mean.

To grow a generic mix of flowers for arrangements and bouquets check out Thompson & Morgan

Other plants discussed in this series
Dahlia
Euphorbia
Pittosporum
Alstroemeria
Fatsia Japonica
Corkscrew hazel
Phormium


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