Scilla or Squill Should Look Like This?

After the ‘Lord Mayors Parade’ gardeners get the manure. After the snow and sometimes during the snow gardeners get the Glory of the Snow or at least the glory of Scilla.
To have a display that looks like a professional start 3 years ago.

To have a garden that looks like Kew start 30+ years ago.

Glory of the snow

I like to grow bulbs in the garden but am often put to shame by other displays. I sometimes wonder ‘Why Don’t My Scilla Look Like This?’ but then realise that comparing your garden to Kew garden or international locations means you are on a hiding to nothing.

Scilla auf dem Friedhof

Tips to Look Like This

  • To have a display that looks like a professional start 3 years ago. To look like Kew start 30+ years ago.
  • Hang up the ‘Do Not Disturb’ sign. Do not go digging and furtling around a bed you wish to mature like these.
  • Give the plants the environment they need to excel.
  • Plant plenty then add some more. Keep them all from the same variety and source.

    My Scilla Photo Gallery

    Scilla mischtschenkoana
    Scilla mischtschenkoana
    Scilla
    Scilla or Glory of the Snow in the grass

    Scilla
    Scilla in the pot.

    Scilla
    Scilla in fine leaf

    Scilla mischtschenkoana
    Scilla mischtschenkoana

    Google search for Scilla images

    Photo and other credits
    Glory of the snow by Kew on Flickr Thousands of glory of the snow (Scilla forbesii) bulbs now (26 March 2012) carpet the lawn near the Orangery.CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
    Scilla auf dem Friedhof by Imhoff-Ehmen CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 (Scilla sibirica)
    Flower photo of Scilla on Gardeners Tips.
    Growing Scilla mischtschenkoana or Squills
    The Giant Madeiran squill (Scilla madeirensis) pictures below from Kew on flickr CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

     

    Madeiran Scilla

    Giant Madeiran squill

    Giant Madeiran squill
    The Giant Madeiran squill (Scilla madeirensis) comes from the Atlantic island of Madeira, where it lives on vertical rock faces.

IMG_4460

Scilla is a genus of about 50 bulb-forming perennial herbs in the hyacinth family native to woodlands, subalpine meadows, and seashores throughout Europe and Asia. Their flowers are usually blue, but white, pink, and purple types are known; most flower in early spring, but a few are autumn-flowering.

If you want to follow Gardeners Tips Posts on Twitter. New posts automatically get tweeted.

See ‘Why don’t my Scilla look like this?’


Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Growing Scilla mischtschenkoana or Squills | Gardeners Tips - May 27, 2012

    […] See ‘Why don’t my Scilla look like this?’ Bulbs ← Dealing With Ants Osteospermum a Winter Survivor → No comments yet. […]

Leave a Reply

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes