Wild Flower Bed with Companion Plants

Meadow

An effective way to use wild flowers  is to mix in some trusted garden plants. Using some  trusted garden stand-bys will provide extra colour and structure to a wild area.

Plants to Support Wild Flower Beds

  • After the Aconites, Snowdrops and Marsh Marigolds the first blooms may be from Primroses or Day Lilies followed by Dianthus to give a mix of vibrant colour.
  • Evening Primrose has yellow bell shaped flowers. Oenothera tetragona flowers in spring on reddish green stems, Oenothera missouriensis¬† later in the year
  • Campanula the blue white or sometimes pink Bellflower can also look good.
  • Foxgloves give height and structure and you could add some Delphiniums.
  • For some white flowers choose Sneezewort ‘Acillea ptarmica’, Candytuft , Ox-eye daisy or Anthemis punctata
  • Heliopsis, Rudbeckia and Achillea are good looking yellows.
  • Cranesbill geraniums and Columbines can also complement wild flowers.

Wild Flowers

  • You can buy seed mixtures aimed at different locations such as Cornfield mix and others from Thompson & Morgan
  • Many individual plants appeal as wild flowers particularly the daisy and buttercups. Still more wild flowers are scented.
  • The red Poppy is potentially one of the most popular varieties and I would opt for Papaver rhoeas.
  • Wild Orchids are harder to grow but if you have the patience they can be rewarding
  • See also Wild Seed Suppliers
  • Do not forget the humble Dandelion in various leaf forms.

Tips on Wild Seed Sowing

  • I am grateful to Selfsufficientish for this tip ‘In the UK the Natural History Museum run an excellent service where you can type in your postcode and see which plant species are native to your area, click here to visit it. It includes species they deem as garden worthy.’
  • Most wildflower seeds are very small so mix some sand in with the seed mixture will make it easier broadcast evenly.
  • Rake the seed in lightly.
  • Water the area and keep the seedlings moist until they are a few inches tall.
  • Germination will occur in 10 – 21 days and your first blooms should reward you in 5-6 weeks.Weeds will try and invade, but wildflowers grow densely and you just need to decide what is a weed and what isn’t.

Field Poppies


Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Wild Flowers in Yorshire | Yorkshire - God's Own County - June 9, 2010

    […] you want a wild garden area of your own read Gardeners Tips for some ideas. For more technical information there is this book by Howard […]

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